Footwork
   
     

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Long Yang form

The Long Yang form does not involve any fancy footwork.
There is plenty of stepping throughout the form, but it is far from dynamic.
How come?


Adjustment

The Long Yang form encourages the student to perceive stepping as being an 'adjustment'.
You alter position favourably by stepping.
But you only step if and when you need to.


Beginners

Beginners practice a variety of footwork drills from the very onset of training.
In order to avoid being hit or caught-up in a struggle, it is necessary to get out of the way.


Lazy

Most people start class with very lazy feet and poor physical sensitivity.
They are reluctant to step, and will stretch out their arms instead - effectively disconnecting the upper and lower body immediately.
Alternatively, they bend their knees too much and then find stepping difficult.
A martial student must become nimble, agile and fluid.


Weapons forms

As they progress through the syllabus, students learn two weapons forms that teach agile footwork:

Walking stick form
Jian form

These forms utilise the movements from the Long Yang form, but the footwork is quite different.
Why is it different?


Weapons range

The range of a weapon is greater and you need to avoid being hit.
In order to utilise the weapon fully, a student needs to move freely and comfortably.
Lumbering footwork is not adequate.
Weapons forms teach fast, responsive footwork and rapid direction changes.


Pao chui and large san sau

The challenging pao chui form is practiced solo and also partnered as the large san sau.
The student has to make continual adjustments against an opponent who possesses equivalent taijiquan skill.
It is not possible to practice pao chui unless the student has very sensitive, nimble feet.

 

In order to escape from danger, one need only take the line of least resistance, just as liquid spills from a vessel over the lowest point of its rim.
Concentrate only on escaping.

(I Ching) 
 


Page created 18 April 1995
Last updated 11 April 2019